Archives of Sparta: Dimotologion (Town Register) Records

I have returned from month-long productive (and exhausting!) research trip to Sparta and there are many posts to write about the resources I have consulted and the records I have obtained.

However, I am starting with the Dimotologion (Town Register) Records that are found at the General Archives of Greece, Sparta office.

Sparta Office, General Archives of Greece

One of the most helpful record collections to help identify families are these Town Registers. They are similar to a U.S. Census record, as they list the husband, wife, and children of each family in a village, the parents’ names of the husband and wife; years and places of birth, occupation, citizenship and other information. These records were created in the mid-1950’s. I find that the birth years of the parents were in the late 1800’s, and the children’s births were in the early-mid 1900’s. If you can find your grand or great-grandparents in a Dimotologion, you will have much information to proceed on your research.

My previous post which gives examples of Dimotologion records, and explains how to read and interpret them, can be found here.

During the two week period that I spent in the Sparta Archives, I made a list of all of the Town Registers that are available in their office. These records are created and kept by village. Therefore, you must know the original name of your family and the exact village of origin.  Researchers can send a request to the Archive Office (mail@gak.lak.sch.gr) to ask if their family is found in the Dimotologion; however, do not submit a request unless you have this specific information. Oftentimes, immigrants would give the nearest large city as their place of origin when in actuality they were from a small village near the city. If you see “Sparta” as the place of origin, keep digging until you have the exact village and original surname! The list  below will help you further understand the importance of knowing the village name.

Village List of Dimotologion (Town Registers) in the Sparta Archives Office
(Note: smaller villages, hamlets and neighborhoods will be found in the record of the larger, closest town)
Aggelona
Agias Eirinis
Agios Vasileios
Agios Georgios
Agios DImitrios
Agios Ioannis Monemvasia
Agios Ioannis Sparta
Agios Konstantinos
Agios Nikolaos
Agios Anavrgiron
Agios Apostolon
Agorianis
Agrianos
Agia (Chania Koutoumous)
Alepochori
Aleirous
Alikon
Ampelochorio
Amykles
Anavryti
Ano Kastanias Voion
Ano Boularion
Anogeion
Apidias
Areopoli
Arna
Archontiko
Asteriou
Asopou
Afissiou
Chrisafo
Chosiari
Daimonias
Dafnis – Kaminion
Dafniou
Drosopigis
Drialou
Drimou
Elaias
Ellinikou Koulentia
Exo Nyfi
Foinikiou
Geraki
Germas
Gerolimena
Georgitsi
Gkoritsa
Glikorvisis
Gorani
Gouvon
Gytheion
Kareas
Karitsa
Kastoriou
Kelefas
Kefala
Kozi-Kokkinorrachi-Riviotissa, Sykaraki, Charision
Konakion
Koniditsa
Kounou
Kremasti
Krinis
Krokeion
Lagia
Lagiou
Lachiou Voion
Leimona
Leikochomatos
Logkaniko
Logkastra
Magoula
Melissas
Melitinis (Zelinas)
Metamorfosis
Minas
Molaoi
Monembasia
Myrteas
Mystras
Neapolis
Neo Oitylo
Neochori
Niaton
Nomion
Oitylo
Pakia
Palaiopanagia
Paliovrisis
Panitsas (Myrsini)
Pantanassas
Papadianiko
Parori
Pellana
Perivolion
Peristeriou (Tsasi)
Perpainis (Kaloni)
Petrina
Platana
Potamia
Prosilio
Pyrgos Dirou
Selegoudiou
Sellasias
Skamnaki
Skouras
Skoutari
Soustiani
Sparta
Spartias
Tsikalion
Vatheia
Vamvakou
Varvitsa
Vasilakiou
Vassara
Vachou
Velanidion
Velion
Vlachioti
Vordonia
Voutiani
Vresthena
Vrontama
Xirokambi

 

 

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Reading a Town Register and a Male Register

My friend and Greek genealogist, Gregory Kontos, prepared some excellent handouts for the Hellenic Genealogy Conference in Salt Lake City on September 26, 2015.

This is a sample of a Dimotologion Koinothtos, or Town Register. It is similar to a U.S. census record as it lists the families in the villages, with parents and children’s names, birthdates, birth places, and other relevant information. These records were created in the 1900’s. The oldest families will have parents born in the late 1800’s, with their children born in the early-mid 1900’s. To my knowledge, there is no such record collection dated earlier than this timeframe, which is unfortunate as we cannot go back to find a father or a mother in this record, when he/she is listed as a child in their parents’ family.

This is page 1 of 2.

Dimotologion 1st page description

 

Here is an example of the 1st page of the Dimotologion, with an entry translated into English.

Dimotologion extracted 1st page

This is page 2 of a Dimotologion. It gives additional information about each person in the family.

Dimotologion 2nd page description

This is a Mitroon Arrenon, or Male Register. It is a record of every male born in a village. It was kept by the government for military draft purposes, and is considered an official register of birth.

Mitroon Arrenon 1st page description

These two record sets are the backbone of genealogy research in Greece. The regional offices of the General State Archives of Greece (GAK) have books with these record collections for the villages over which they have jurisdiction.

A list of the Regional  GAK offices can be found here: http://www.gak.gr/Cont/cont-py-00.html. The page can be translated into English using Google translate. If you write for information, include whatever you know about the family you are searching. It is especially important to know the spelling of the original surname in Greek (e.g., Papagiannakos, not just Pappas). You must also know the exact village and its location because there are many villages with the same name (e.g., not just Agios Ioannis, but Agios Ioannis Sparta).